Nicotine Dependence – It’ll Get You Back If It Can

Quit One Day, Smoking Again The Next?

nicotine dependence & addictionThe siren song of Nicotine, the chemical in cigarette smoke that makes your quit attempts more difficult, doesn’t just go away the day after you take your last puff.  As many a Quitting ex-smoker knows, it can take weeks for the cravings to subside, and then you still get the occasional pang from time to time, in places and situations where you used to smoke.  These cravings, considered by many doctors to be wholly caused by the absence of Nicotine in the subjects system, are now treated by NRT – or Nicotine Replacement Therapy, and other medicines that block the receptor sites that Nicotine attaches to in the brain.

But if NRT or other chemical treatments is all it takes, why are there still people who fail at a Quit Attempt?  Shouldn’t they all be successful, the first time they use these quit smoking aids?

Well it turns out that there is a lot more to it than just the chemical side of things, and that is an oft missed angle that our product, ‘The Complete Lung Detoxification Guide’ Series aims to cover.  In our product we cover NRT and other therapies – some of which may surprise you – to combat the chemical side of the equation, but we also cover the psychological dependence side as well.  This is something that many other products simply do not do.

The following is a taste of the sort of tips available in Book 2 – The Complete Quit Smoking Guide.

Being Ready For The Siren Call

So you’ve got your NRT or equivalent chemical substitute happening for you, you’ve passed your Quit Day, and you ARE doing it, you HAVE quit! But the itch is still there.  Why do you still feel like a smoke?  We cover this is great detail in our Guides Series, but it has to do with the way your mental ‘habit’ of smoking has effected your mind.  Here is one example:

It’s a pressure called the Situational Smoking Effect (SSE) – where you mind actually down-regulates your neurochemicals when you are in a situation or place where you regularly smoked in the past.  It works like this – when you first started smoking, you got a buzz out of it, but after a while, you had to smoke just to feel OK.  No more buzz, yeah?  Well that is your brain becoming ‘used’ to having a regular nicotine supply.  That is why you feel bad when you don’t smoke, and why it is not a simple thing to quit – until you train your brain to go back to the way it was originally.  But after you have ‘trained’ your brain to expect a nicotine hit in a certain place or situation, it gets ready for it by down-regulating your neurochemicals (it’s actually a throwback from a system to prevent a dose of a chemical from hurting you– nicotine is a poison in high does after all).  So there you are, having gone through the ‘tough times’ of nicotine withdrawal, and you’re feeling better, over the ‘worst of it,’ and on your way to healthy lungs.  And then you go to that place or are in that situation, and BANG, you get a pang, and it can sometimes be strong enough to break your resolve.  THAT is the SSE, and if you are not ready for it, it can beat you.

But Knowledge is Power, and our product contains effective tips to combat the SSE, and many other pitfalls of the Quit Journey.

2 More Days!

We are getting really close now to the release of the updated Guides for 2011!  Over the first six days of the New Year, we’ll have a series of New Year’s Resolution Lung Detox posts, all related to the new release and to starting the adventure to a healthier new you.  Check back tomorrow for the fifth topic in the series; Life After Cigarettes – The Social Impacts Of Quitting.

Until tomorrow,

Happy New Year, stay well, stay quit, and lung-toxin free.

William Renolds